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Antonio Giovinazzi

Giovinazzi on Formula E: Like driving an F1 car in the rain

Antonio Giovinazzi is relishing the challenge of switching to Formula E after three years in F1.

Giovinazzi Austria 2021
Article
To news overview © Alfa Romeo

Antonio Giovinazzi believes the challenge of moving to Formula E from Formula 1 won't be insignificant, as the Italian driver switches series for 2022.

Giovinazzi wasn't retained by Alfa Romeo in F1 and has found refuge with the Dragon Penske Formula E team for 2022 alongside a reserve and development role at Ferrari.

Having previously driven a Formula E car in 2018, he also took part in two days of testing in Valencia last month before the Saudi Arabian Grand Prix. Following this test, he admitted that the newer generation of Formula E machine isn't particularly easy to adjust to.

"I was expecting that it will not be easy, especially as I drove the [Gen1] car in 2018 at the rookie test," Giovinazzi told The Race.

"This [Gen2 car] for sure is better, but I was expecting it to be a little more easy. It was really complicated in terms of braking."

Vastly different to F1

Comparing the grip of the Formula E car to that of an F1 car in the rain, Giovinazzi said he will have to completely rewire the way he drives to adjust to the electric series.

"I remember after the first day I was completely lost. I just needed to put some new inputs to my mind because it is a car that in terms of balance and everything, I never drove before," he explained.

"Here you need to brake really soft, you have not much grip, so no downforce, and you can't carry a lot of speed into the corners. Everything was new [and with] no sound. Then we went to the race pace energy management and it was all new, new things for myself.

"I'm still not feeling 100 percent with the car but it's something that I like [and] to try to do the best work possible with just a few days with the team and the car."

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