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Carlos Sainz

More penalties for Ferrari-powered cars at the French GP

A raft of new power unit components for Carlos Sainz and Kevin Magnussen will see both drivers start the French Grand Prix from the back of the grid.

Sainz France
Article
To news overview © RN365/Michael Potts

Carlos Sainz and Kevin Magnussen will start Sunday's French Grand Prix from the back of the grid, after both drivers exceeded their permitted usage of several power unit components before FP3 at Paul Ricard.

Both Sainz and Magnussen have taken on their fourth engine, turbocharger, MGU-H and MGU-K of the season, with teams only being permitted to use three of each component.

Sainz was already assured of at least a 10-place grid drop for the French Grand Prix before Friday practice, after taking on his third control electronics of 2022 with only two permitted.

The Spaniard had retired from the Austrian Grand Prix two weeks ago with fire billowing from the rear of his Ferrari, prompting speculation that he would need several new components installed ahead of the Paul Ricard event.

No penalties for new exhausts

Sainz and Magnussen have also taken on their fifth new exhaust system of 2022, with Sainz's teammate Charles Leclerc having his seventh exhaust installed.

However, with teams permitted eight exhaust systems for the season, none of these new components will incur a penalty.

"We changed almost everything on [Kevin's car] and he will start from the back of the grid," Haas Team Principal Guenther Steiner told Sky Sports F1.

"It's disappointing, but we had to use a fourth engine at some stage, and we decided to do it here, so it is what it is."

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F1 2022 French Grand Prix RN365 News dossier

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