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Emilia Romagna Grand Prix 2022

F1 clarifies racing rules as driver guidelines are issued

The FIA have published the rules of engagement for drivers racing against each other on track, revealing what is and isn't allowed to be done during wheel-to-wheel battle.

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In a move to improve the transparency behind how race stewards make their decisions, the FIA have released a copy of the 'Driving Standard Guidelines' which are being applied across Formula 1, 2, and 3.

The document was sent to the F3 paddock ahead of the Emilia Romagna Grand Prix, following on from the same article being issued privately to the F1 field ahead of the season-opener in Bahrain.

Dated 19 March, the document outlines what drivers are and aren't permitted to do in wheel-to-wheel battle with their rivals, and has been set out "in response to a request from F1 drivers to confirm the factors that may be taken into account by the FIA stewards, when decisions are made in relation to certain repeated infringements that occur in the course of a season".

The FIA emphasised: "For [the] avoidance of doubt, these are merely guidelines to assist the stewards in their decision making and are non-binding.

"All stewards' decisions will be made pursuant to the FIA International Sporting Code read in conjunction with all relevant regulations applicable to F1."

Overtaking on the inside of a corner

"In order for a car being overtaken to be required to give sufficient room to an overtaking car, the overtaking car needs to have a significant portion of the car alongside the car being overtaken and the overtaking manoeuvre must be done in a safe and controlled manner, while enabling the car to clearly remain within the limits of the track.

"When considering what is a 'significant portion' for an overtaking on the inside of a corner, among the various factors that will be looked at by the stewards when exercising their discretion, the stewards will consider if the overtaking car's front tyres are alongside the other car by no later than the apex of the corner."

Overtaking on the outside of a corner

“In order for a car being overtaken to be required to give sufficient room to an overtaking car, the overtaking car needs to have a significant portion of the car alongside the car being overtaken and the overtaking manoeuvre must be done in a safe and controlled manner, while enabling the car to clearly remain within the limits of the track.

"When considering what is a 'significant portion', for an overtaking on the outside of a corner, among the various factors that will be looked at by the stewards when exercising their discretion, the stewards will consider if the overtaking car is ahead of the other car from the apex of the corner.

"The car being overtaken must be capable of making the corner while remaining within the limits of the track."

Other clarifications

The above guidelines will also apply for the likes of chicanes and S-bends, the FIA have stated.

Other clarifications include circuit track limits, which state: "For the avoidance of doubt, the white lines defining the track edges are considered to be part of the track, but the kerbs are not.

"Should a car leave the track for any reason, the driver may re-join. However, this may only be done when it is safe to do so and without gaining any lasting advantage.

"A driver will be judged to have left the track if no part of the car remains in contact with the track."

The FIA have also cleared up how the tricky situation of 'giving back a lasting advantage' will be handled if a driver leaves the track in this scenario.

"If a driver, for example, short-cuts a chicane or a corner, it is his or her responsibility to clearly give back the advantage he or she gained," the documents read.

"This may include giving back the timing advantage up to drop back a position behind the relevant driver."

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F1 2022 Emilia Romagna Grand Prix RN365 News dossier

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