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Aston Martin

Aston Martin boss follows up with clear message over 'Red Bull copy' claims

Aston Martin were accused of copying Red Bull with an upgrade package applied at the Spanish Grand Prix, but the FIA cleared them of any wrongdoing.

Vettel Silverstone
Article
To news overview © Aston Martin F1

Mike Krack has defended Aston Martin's developmental efforts after the team were accused of copying Red Bull earlier in the season.

Aston Martin unveiled a major update package for their AMR22 at the Spanish Grand Prix, drawing instant comparisons to Red Bull's RB18.

Aston Martin firmly denied claims of illegally obtaining Red Bull's intellectual property and were cleared of any wrongdoing by the FIA.

In a mid-season interview for the official Aston Martin F1 website, Krack offered a clear message as he looked back on the situation.

"We've been wrongly accused of copying this season," the team boss commented.

"The new rear wing we brought to the Hungarian Grand Prix underlined our ability to innovate and steal a march on the opposition by coming up with ideas our rivals haven't."

Krack praises Aston Martin development push

Despite the team's Spanish GP upgrades failing to deliver a noticeable step forward relative to their rivals, Krack praised the hard work of the design and production teams at Aston Martin.

"Every team is bringing upgrades and we're no different," he continued.

"We've made significant upgrades to the car throughout the first part of the season, but it's all relative.

"People assume the upgrades haven't worked because we haven't climbed up the competitive order, but the upgrades have worked – just not enough for us to catch up.

"It belies the amount of work that's gone on at the factory and at the track to bring them to the car.

"People don't necessarily realise the amount of effort that goes into the design and the production of these parts – and the sheer intensity of the work we're doing."

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